The News That’s Not Reported

By Steve Byers

The New York Times’ Frank Rich used the White House Correspondent’s Dinner over the weekend as his example in a discussion of how television has given up covering the news, noting the 24/7 cable “news” stations covered the dinner but not a bomb threat in Times Square.

It reminded me of a friend who is woefully ignorant of what’s going on in the world despite listening to talk radio and watching television “news.” He also regularly reads online news. Recently he asked another friend “Was there some controversy” about the 2000 presidential election. When the constitutional crisis was explained, he said, “Oh, yes. I guess I did hear something about it.” Despite listening and watching talk and “news” programs, he doesn’t have a clue about what’s really going on.

Rich decried television, especially the cable version, for its willingness to ignore facts that don’t fit its political slant. That’s a deep concern of mine. Presenting facts is at the core of journalism, and something we insure is instilled in our students. Is that going to work against them in finding jobs?

Steve Byers is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Journalism at Marquette University’s Diederich College of Communication.

2 Responses to “The News That’s Not Reported”


  1. 1 scottfeldstein May 14, 2010 at 2:50 pm

    This is one of the main reasons why I gave up television years ago. TV news is shallow, sensational and too political. And local TV news is even worse.


  1. 1 Tweets that mention The News That’s Not Reported « Communicate: The Diederich College of Communication blog -- Topsy.com Trackback on May 14, 2010 at 1:59 pm

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The opinions expressed here are those of the individual authors and do not represent the views of Marquette University or the Diederich College of Communication.

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