Archive for the 'Global Communication' Category

Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A 21st Century Skill Set for Success

By Jennifer Janviere

With the recent academic year now behind us, the focus for new graduates shifts towards the future. For many young people with newly minted degrees, this will be the time to go out into the world equipped with ambition and enthusiasm as they search for that first full time job and begin climbing the career ladder.

With recent discussions in the media centering around the challenge faced by many young people to find meaningful employment, the topic of building an arsenal of versatile life and career skills is an especially relevant one. How can the educational system best equip young people to meet these challenges?

Recently, I ran across an interesting article in Forbes online written by contributor Erica Swallow that explored the shift from the skills traditionally taught by America’s educational system towards a focus on innovation and entrepreneurship. The title of the article, “Why America’s Educational System is Obsolete” is clearly meant to be provocative, but the article raises some interesting points. Continue reading ‘Innovation and Entrepreneurship: A 21st Century Skill Set for Success’

Building a Corporate Conscience

By Meghan O’Leary

Panel discussion at the Corporate Communication Commons event, April 20, 2012

Panel discussion at the Corporate Communication Commons event, April 20, 2012. Photo: Wakerly Technology Training Center.

This past April, Marquette University and the Diederich College welcomed over 50 corporate communication professionals as we hosted the first ever Corporate Communication Commons event on campus. The conference, entitled Building a Corporate Conscience, examined one of the most pressing issues in today’s corporate world: the lack of public trust in corporations.

Speakers included Richard Edelman (Edelman PR), Jon Iwata (IBM), Kimberley Goode (Northwestern Mutual), Katerina Tsetsura (University of Oklahoma), Roger Bolton (Arthur Page Society), Scott D’Urso (Marquette University), Tom Beall and Bess Bezirgan (both with Ogilvy Public Relations).

The event kicked off on the evening of Thursday, April 19 with a student networking session led by Diederich College faculty member Jeremy Fyke. During the session,  students had the opportunity to discuss topics such as career/college challenges and community involvement with corporate communication professionals. Afterward, the conference participants visited the jPad student lounge for an opening reception. Dean Lori Bergen welcomed the participants to the conference, and Associate Professor Sarah Feldner introduced the purpose of gathering a group of peers to discuss the common issues faced in the field of corporate communication.

On Friday, the day began with a breakfast keynote by Richard Edelman, who reflected on the need for communications professionals to become the conscience of their organizations. The message was that if people in this role are willing to actually advise the executives, they have the power to truly change organizations from within and win back public trust.

This message set the tone for the rest of the day’s presentations, and was also echoed in the words of other speakers. Kimberley Goode used Northwestern Mutual as example of how a company can thrive if it has a commitment to values and trust. In contrast, Roger Bolton mentioned Aetna as example of both what to do and what not to when trying to create a successful and trusted organization.

Other topics that emerged throughout the day included the need for corporate transparency, the use of social media, and developing a new communication model for organizations. The use of social media was a salient topic as many of the participants were tweeting throughout the day, using the #mucommons hashtag. The event concluded with “Diederich Ideas, a 30-mintue program featuring a panel discussion with the participants about the future of corporate communication.

View photos from the event on our Flickr gallery

 Meghan O’Leary is a student in the Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University.

Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service Wins 2012 Edward R. Murrow Regional Award

By Diederich College of Communication

Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service logoCongratulations to the Milwaukee Neighborhood News Service (NNS), whose staff received a 2012 regional Edward R. Murrow Award from the RTDNA (Radio, Television, Digital News Association), in the online news category. The team will also be eligible for a national award, which will be announced this summer.

Located in the Diederich College’s Johnston Hall, Milwaukee NNS was launched in March 2011. Visit their website at www.milwaukeenns.org or follow them on Twitter at @MilwaukeeNNS.

Digital Storytelling: An International Exchange of Ideas

By Jennifer Janviere

Joe Lambert speaks at the Relato Digital Storytelling Conference in Valencia, Spain.

Joe Lambert speaks at the Relato Digital Storytelling Conference in Valencia, Spain.

Last month,  I had the opportunity to attend the international Relato Digital Storytelling Conference at the Universitat de Valencia in Spain. I was there to present a video poster that I’d created with my friends and colleagues Daria Kempka and Mandi Linder about using the tools for multimedia narrative to empower people who had experienced past traumatic life experiences. I was also fortunate to learn from the presentations of other academics and storytelling professionals at the conference (not to mention getting the chance to put my Spanish language skills into practice).

There were many great ideas that people shared during the event. Some of these were entirely new concepts, while others were affirmations about the importance of this creative medium. Continue reading ‘Digital Storytelling: An International Exchange of Ideas’

March Madness Through the Eyes of Twitter

By Claire Karon

March madness. This month is dominated by the most intense, grueling, and emotional tournament in college basketball. It consumes the lives of people young, old, sports fans, and non-sports fans alike. There is something fascinating about watching basketball games between teams you never thought would play each other, and trying your best to predict the outcome. Who doesn’t get a thrill out of arguing with family and friends about which NCAA Men’s basketball team is superior?

Especially when you have no connection to that team, or the reason you want them to win is because the team they are playing you absolutely can’t stand. It is the time of the year to prove to yourself how much you know about college hoops, and if you are like me, to prove to your friends and family you know more than them too…who doesn’t like a little bit of friendly competition.

Tweet 1

The story is no different here at Marquette. If you kept up with the MU Basketball season at all this year, you know that it was filled with lots of exciting games, devastating losses, and a huge amount of support from the Marquette community. Lots of this support came from one of our favorite social media sites; Twitter. From my perspective it almost seems that Twitter is becoming just as popular (if not more) than Facebook. Especially when trying to reach a large group of people with similar interests. The Marquette community is a very tight knit one. Yet for a “medium sized” school our following is exponentially greater than that. Support from students, alums, families, and the community helped make Marquette’s NCAA Tournament experience that much more exciting. There are a number of different Twitter accounts that are all associated with Marquette University, and during tournament time most of the Tweets are usually something #mubb related.

Tweet 2 Continue reading ‘March Madness Through the Eyes of Twitter’

Journalism and Ethics in India

By Steve Byers

I recently spent a couple of weeks teaching a Marquette University Diederich College of Communication-sponsored journalism workshop in Ahmadabad, India, so I was struck by this story from Bloomberg View concerning journalism at the two top —and growing —print newspapers in India. Together they sell more than five million newspapers a day.

Basically, the story attacks the journalism of the two, the Times of India and the Hindu, finding it lacking in much of the basic integrity as well as professionalism seen in journalism around the world.  I talked with executives from the Times of India, and both in informal and formal speeches they echoed some of the concerns about how journalism is practiced in their country.

Further, Father Vincent Braganza, head of St. Xavier’s College, which promoted the workshop we taught, was quite open in his disappointment concerning journalism in India, which he said was shallow, lacking in ethics and rife with errors — all elements of the Bloomberg story.

My view after reading the Indian papers for two weeks, is that the criticism is quite true. The Times of India would be considered sensationalist by American standards. Word choice is atrocious, and errors are common. Frankly, the Hindu is dull.

Father Braganza’s solution is the teaching of journalism, which is rare in that country. Only a handful of journalism programs exist, he said, with most journalists trained in English departments. Father Braganza says that means they lack grounding in ethics and philosophy. That would explain the shortcomings seen in the Bloomberg piece. Despite growing sales, that lack of professionalism bodes ill for India’s future.

Steve Byers is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Journalism at Marquette University’s Diederich College of Communication.

Comm Magazine Now Available as iTunes App

Comm magazine app, available in the iTunes store

If you haven’t seen it yet, be sure to check out the Diederich College of Communication’s new Comm Magazine app. It’s available as a free download from the iTunes app store. Get your copy today and keep up with our latest news and events!